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September 12th I got…

My heart a little broken by life, so I went to Barnes & Noble to cheer myself up.

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Air – Ryan Gattis

Okay, this book has been shortlisted to the top of my TBR list because I just think it sounds so cool. And–don’t judge me–I just got this feeling inside when I picked it off the shelf.

The cool thing about this novel is that it comes from Adaptive Books, which is a publishing house taking old, unused screenplays and translating them into novels. I think that is THE coolest idea, and I recently read DC Trip, which was another unused screenplay turned novel.

After 17-year-old Grey witnesses the tragic death of his mother in Colorado, he is shipped off to live with his aunt in inner-city Baltimore, where he struggles to fit in to a new school and community. His new friend Akil introduces him to the enigmatic Kurtis, the leader of a group that uses high-octane sports as a form of social activism. By challenging the police with death-defying stunts and posting videos of them online, Kurtis, Grey, and their group become unlikely heroes in the fight against the prejudice that surrounds them.

As Kurtis takes Grey under his wing, they create a group name, an insignia, and a cause attracting more and more followers as they post videos of their extreme acts. The lines between social activism and criminal behavior blur and their escalating stunts become a rallying point for the underprivileged and disenfranchised around the country, spreading like wildfire across the Internet. How far will Grey and Kurtis go to push their message, and can their friendship withstand their growing notoriety?

DOES THAT NOT SOUND SO FRICKEN COOL???

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The Invoice – Jonas Karlsson

I highly recommend buying this book used. It’s like the size of a passport and costs $21 new, which is atrocious for such a small novel, there are hardly two hundred pages. But nevertheless, I splurge for books that pull me in.

A heartfelt exploration of the cost of life and love—and the importance of the little things—from the author of the international bestseller, The Room

Hilarious, profound, and achingly true-to-life, Jonas Karlsson’s new novel explores the true nature of happiness through the eyes of hero you won’t soon forget. A passionate film buff, our hero’s life revolves around his part-time job at a video store, the company of a few precious friends, and a daily routine that more often than not concludes with pizza and movie in his treasured small space in Stockholm. When he receives an astronomical invoice from a random national bureaucratic agency, everything will tumble into madness as he calls the hotline night and day to find out why he is the recipient of the largest bill in the entire country.
            What is the price of a cherished memory? How much would you pay for a beautiful summer day? How will our carefree idealist, who is content with so little and has no chance of paying it back, find a way out of this mess? All these questions pull you through The Invoice and prove once again that Jonas Karlsson is simply a master of entertaining, intelligent, and life-affirming work.

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Another Brooklyn – Jacqueline Woodson

Man, guys, I found some GREAT stories. This one sounds so freakin’ cool I’m almost annoyed I can’t just read books at the speed of light.

Running into a long-ago friend sets memory from the 1970s in motion for August, transporting her to a time and a place where friendship was everything—until it wasn’t. For August and her girls, sharing confidences as they ambled through neighborhood streets, Brooklyn was a place where they believed that they were beautiful, talented, brilliant—a part of a future that belonged to them.

But beneath the hopeful veneer, there was another Brooklyn, a dangerous place where grown men reached for innocent girls in dark hallways, where ghosts haunted the night, where mothers disappeared. A world where madness was just a sunset away and fathers found hope in religion.

Like Louise Meriwether’s Daddy Was a Number Runner and Dorothy Allison’s Bastard Out of Carolina, Jacqueline Woodson’s Another Brooklyn heartbreakingly illuminates the formative time when childhood gives way to adulthood—the promise and peril of growing up—and exquisitely renders a powerful, indelible, and fleeting friendship that united four young lives.

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Diary of an Oxygen Thief – Anonymous

Lol, guys, I know. This one looks like a train wreck and I didn’t do it justice with the photo, but I didn’t feel like jazzing it up because it’s kind of a stand-alone. I don’t know what I’m gonna be getting myself into when I start it, but I know that its mystery makes me want to forget my current read and dive in right now.

Hurt people hurt people.

Say there was a novel in which Holden Caulfield was an alcoholic and Lolita was a photographer’s assistant and, somehow, they met in Bright Lights, Big City. He’s blinded by love. She by ambition. Diary of an Oxygen Thief is an honest, hilarious, and heartrending novel, but above all, a very realistic account of what we do to each other and what we allow to have done to us.

 

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